/// Blog Archive

12 Feb / 2016
Author: RobynSmith Tags: There is no tags Comments: 4

Anemonefish in LembehHave you ever noticed that the majority of Anemonefish in Lembeh have tongue-biting isopods in their mouth? Most of the isopods are so small they are hardly noticeable. This week, however, this large, female Cheek-Spine Anemonefish put on quite the show as she gaped at divers, showing off her over-sized creepy critter.

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05 Feb / 2016
Author: RobynSmith Tags: There is no tags Comments: 0

Cryptic Shrimp sighting in LembehSeventh and Ninth-time return guests to the region were excited by their first Cryptic Shrimp sighting in Lembeh this week! These cool little critters so perfectly resemble the sponge they inhabit that they are nearly impossible to differentiate from their background. The Cryptic Shrimp’s innate ability to perfectly blend in with its surroundings is a type of crypsis camouflage: an animal’s natural-born ability to visually blend in with its habitat in order to avoid predation.

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01 Feb / 2016
Author: RobynSmith Tags: There is no tags Comments: 0

 “Camouflage” is a fascinating behavior that many Lembeh animals partake in“Camouflage” is a fascinating behavior that many Lembeh animals partake in as they take on the characteristics of an unrelated, inanimate object, simply hoping to go unnoticed by predators. Juvenile Orbicular Batfish are a perfect example of such a critter. Lacking toxins or venomous spines, they spend their juvenile months perfectly camouflaged as fallen leaves as they float about in small schools under the piers and oyster-farms of Lembeh. What would otherwise be a small, tasty morsel for a passing predator is dismissed as an uninteresting, inedible leaf. As the Orbicular Batfish reaches a more formidable size (topping out around 28cm/11in), they no longer depend on camouflage and transform into a completely different looking fish!
(Click on the provided link to read more)

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15 Jan / 2016
Author: RobynSmith Tags: There is no tags Comments: 5

How knowledgeable is your Lembeh dive guide?Have you ever marveled at how knowledgeable your Lembeh dive guide is? How do they know the names of individual Nudibranches off the top of their head? How do they know which animals are mating and which animals are fighting? And how do they know where to look for all the camouflaged animals they find? Their knowledge may stem from the many hundreds of dives they’ve done in Lembeh. But it may also be due to some of the wonderful resources at their disposal. For those of you that are interested in learning a bit more about the Lembeh critters yourselves, this blog is for you…
(continue reading by clicking on link below)

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08 Jan / 2016
Author: RobynSmith Tags: There is no tags Comments: 7

Starry Night Octopus and Starry Blennies in LembehDue to all the Starry Night Octopus and Starry Blennies in Lembeh this week, an old, classic Holiday tune was re-born. “O Starry Night, your Eyes are Brightly Shining…” I sang to myself as we watched a beautiful Starry Night Octopus dance across the reef during a night dive. Unlike many other varieties of octopus, which slip into the closest hole at the first sign of light, the Starry Night is rather intrigued by dive lights. (Click on the Two Fish website link to read more…)
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